Lead-Carbon (PbC) batteries have, ranging from hybrid vehicles to large-scale power plants. It is made by electrically connecting a porous carbon component to the negative plate of the lead-acid battery. The porous carbon component, known as the supercapacitor, acts as a charge buffer to suppress the negative plate sulfation, thus prolongs the battery lifetime. However, due to the chemical inertness of carbon, forming an ohmic contact between lead and carbon is a challenging task. This presentation will describe two surface modification methods, one by oxidation treatment and the other by co-deposition of lead with tungsten, to enhance the bonding between lead and carbon while reducing the contact resistance. We will demonstrate that the storage efficiency is above 90% for a PbC battery incorporating surface modified carbon monolith electrodes. The lifetime of this PbC battery is at least five times longer than the conventional counter part.


Yi-Ren Tzeng
Division of Nuclear Fuels and Materials, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research
Associate Engineer

Shu-Huei Shieh
Department of Materials Science & Engineering, National Formosa University
Associate Professor

Anthony S.T. Chiang
Department of Chemical & Materials Engineering, National Central University
Professor

Charn-Ying Chen
Division of Nuclear Fuels and Materials, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research
Senior Research Scientist and Director

Biography: Dr. Charn-Ying Chen is a senior research scientist and the department head in the Division of Nuclear Fuels and Materials, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan.


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